Rancona Dimension Gives Easy Disease Protection

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Making the change to an easier to use seed treatment to combat rhizoctonia and reduce handling issues at seeding has paid off for Gerard and Mark Paganoni on their mixed farming operation at Broomehill in WA. 

Gerard Paganoni and his family have farmed in Broomehill for 28 years with a 60:40 ratio of cropping to sheep. The cropping program of approximately 2,600 hectares consists of 2,100 hectares of cereals with a balance of lupins and canola on the rest. 

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SA Growers Reap Benefits From Seed Treatment Combo

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Protecting your cereal crop during the vulnerable establishment stage is a strategy that has paid off for SA grain growers Simon and Nick McCormack. 

Simon and Nick, of McCormack Farming in Barunga Gap, are fifth generation on their farm which was established in 1873. Their father Paul is still actively involved in the mixed farming operation, consisting of 2,100 hectares of cropping and 500 hectares of hill country for running sheep. 

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Seed Preparation Key to Good Start for NSW Grower

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Getting your crop off to a good start begins with quality inputs and seed preparation according to New South Wales grain grower Peter Finlayson. 

Peter and Eleanor Finlayson are dryland broadacre crop and sheep farmers from Berrigan in NSW. Their annual cropping program consists of up to 1400 hectares of wheat, 3–400 hectares of barley, 600 hectares of lupins and 700 hectares of canola on rotation. 

Peter said they’ve realised the long term benefits of having lupins in the rotation. 

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Rancona Dimension still a hit in cereal crops

Thursday, November 22, 2018

In 2014 Roger Baines went looking for solutions for the bare patches appearing in his wheat and barley crops. Four years later, he stands by the product that’s helped solve his problem.

​Baines Bros Farms in Cummins South Australia is a mixed farming enterprise of 1,000 ha cropping and 3,000 breeding merino ewes. Roger grows wheat, barley and canola on sand over clay soils in a pasture-crop rotation.

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Rancona Dimension continues to deliver for WA farmers

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Increasing levels of root disease in cereals in recent years, including crown rot at low levels in many WA wheat crops, means managing these diseases and using relevant seed treatments is a real consideration.

Esperance farmer, Stewart Wallace of Wallbrook Farms, had local Hannaford franchisee Simon Roper apply Rancona Dimension seed treatment for the first time this season.

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Easy handling & effective root disease management a winning combination for WA farmers

Monday, February 20, 2017

Geoff Stade and his brother David farm 3,600 hectares on a mixed cropping and grazing property at Katanning. They crop wheat, barley, oats, canola and lupins on 60 percent of the farm and raise Dorper lambs on their clover pastures.

Geoff needed to manage the rhizoctonia patches in their cereal crops and was experiencing dust and residue issues on their machinery from seed treatment products. Based on advice from his local agronomist and Hannaford franchisee Derek Batchelor, Geoff used Rancona® Dimension seed treatment for the first time.

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Rancona Dimension delivering results in WA

Monday, February 20, 2017

Departments of Agriculture from Western Australia to New South Wales have reported an increase in root diseases in cereals this season.

These diseases include the potentially damaging crown rot and rhizoctonia.

The impact of these root diseases has been minimised in instances where farmers have implemented appropriate management strategies and used seed treatments.

Eric Patterson, Katanning Western Australia, used Rancona® Dimension seed treatment on his cereal seed for the first time in the 2016 season.

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The drum that does it all is a hit in the Mallee

Monday, February 20, 2017

Departments of Agriculture from Western Australia to New South Wales have reported an increase in root diseases in cereals this season.

These diseases include the potentially damaging crown rot and rhizoctonia.

The impact of these root diseases has been minimized in instances where farmers have implemented appropriate management strategies and used seed treatments.

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